03.09.18

CrossFit Ecstatic – CrossFit


Notes


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yud-6E6gpjo&width=640&height=480

Strategy


Overarching thoughts:
Management of our shoulders is key to Open 18.3. It is a common talk between athletes on the calves taking a good working from the amount of double-unders inside this workout, but in reality, shoulders are the focus point. Those who can properly put their shoulders in the best positions inside these movements, from double-unders, to gymnastic pulling, to overhead squat and dumbbell snatches, will find their best scores in Open 18.3. Recovery of the calves and achilles will be important afterwards, but the theme of of 18.3 is shoulder management as we move through this 14:00 workout.
Much like how the movements of Open 18.1 compounded on each other, we see an intentional combination here. Mechanics (moving efficiently) is our first focus, with specific breakup strategies being the second train of thought. We want to move in with a gameplan, or a repetition scheme in mind, *but*… what is far more important than a game plan is the ability to recognize that we need to slow down (or even speed up), given how we feel.
To start, if there is one thing to move into tomorrow, with, it is to focus first on the double-unders. Naturally, muscle-up strategy with vary quite a bit between athletes, but all can benefit from approaching the rope with the right mindset – whether we are looking to complete all eight sets of double-unders, or a single 100.

Notes


A mindset we can take – minimize trips. As simple as this sounds, if our goal is to minimize the amount of trips, we naturally break the rope sooner. If we are awaiting until we trip, chances are that we may be pushing too far in the set and our form is slipping. Towards the end of the workout – let’s go for it of course – but, in the first few sets of double-unders, it is best to break before so. We can all agree that a trip on the rope is more taxing, energy wise, than a purposeful break. With the larger picture in mind, we would rather see 5×20 DU, purposely broken, than 3 trips due to fatigue. A common pitfall for athletes in this workout will be to push the double-unders too far, too soon. When our double-under efficiency declines in a workout, it is very, very, very difficult to bring it back. It’s much like “hitting a wall” on handstand pushups. Fighting off a loss of efficiency through proper pacing is highly important to finding our best score.
As example breakup strategies, purely for examples:
A) 50-50
B) 40-40-30
C) 30-30-20-20
D) 25-25-25-25
E) 20-20-20-20-20
Now these numbers are great to move in with. Having a plan is a good thing. But, especially with double-unders, let’s be prepared to adapt and overcome. If we feel our efficiency fading, break early. It is a *very* fast transition to start the rope up once again. But the last place we want to be here is finding ourselves digging out inefficient double-unders early in the workout. This will only compound to slower sets later on, not to mention shoulder fatigue in the following gymnastic and weighted movements.

Strategy


Of all movements in CrossFit, the double-under arguably illicits the most frustration. In those moments, we need to remind ourselves that “trying harder” often makes the situation worse. We need to recompose, relax, and make the adjustment. Calm, cool, and collected on these repetitions.
Every time we return back to the rope, pick it up, and give yourself a composure pause. Whereas in 18.1 and 18.2 we sought after immediate transitions, we actually want to consider the opposite approach here. Rushing into a large set of double-unders can cause unnecessary trips, which is ultimately wasted effort (and time). It is worth a brief re-composure breath to center ourselves on the rope. With the larger workout in mind, we know that moving into these repetitions with our best technique (relaxed shoulders, wrists doing the work for us) sets us up for our best score.
On the overhead squats, we are not looking to make up time here. Our largest focus is on efficiency of movement, so that our shoulders are not unnecessarily fatigued for the next set of double-unders. An important note here is to ensure that we are maintaining a relaxed wrist on these squats. It is common for athletes to death-grip the barbell, which inevitably causes forearm fatigue. Take an extra moment to find our positioning, lock it in, and hold a steady and smooth pace with efficiency at the forefront. We naturally do not want to hold the bar overhead for any longer than we need to, but moving well here sets us up for our following repetitions on the jump rope.

Notes


If able, a slightly more narrow grip allows for stronger positioning, and a bit less tax on the wrists (which can help for the following double-unders). But, take this slightly more narrow grip *only* if allows us to squat efficiently. If it pulls us forward, wasting energy, it’s naturally not worth the change.
We are looking to move through these repetitions with at most a single break. A tactical pause before the next jump rope is to take place, so we are looking to minimize the amount of times we are going to bring the barbell overhead.
On the ring muscle-ups, focus on our backswing. Especially in shoulder-intensive combinations, we tend to loose the length and quality of the backswing. But much like the first pull of a snatch, it’s pivotal to finding a good repetition… it starts the movement. Be the long whip, and get our legs extended long behind our body.
In terms of a breakup strategy – there is not a right or wrong. But, let’s apply the same theme we started with – shoulder management. Recognizing that all movements in 18.3 impact the shoulders, pushing here on the rings at the expense of the following double-unders may not be our best plan. We are looking to sustain our effort for 14:00, and despite them being “different” movements, they can absolutely compound on each other. Breaking these up into smaller chunks than we may think can pay off with the bigger picture in mind.
If we are currently building our muscle-ups, and for-see ourselves spending the remainder of the 14:00 time cap here for max repetitions, we want to move through the first three stations (100 DU, 20 OHS, 100 DU) for time. Push our pace here, as the tiebreaker time after the second set of double-unders counts.

Strategy


On the dumbbell power snatches, there is a new standard this year if we are looking to change hands in the air – that the dumbbell must be lowered beneath the top of the athlete’s head before changing hands. To keep it simple, and to give ourselves a target, let’s aim to change hands at neck level. This still allows us plenty of room to meet the standard, but also allows us to change hands before the weight picks up significantly more inertia as it returns to the ground. Much like the overhead squats, we aren’t looking to make up time here. Maintaining efficiency is at the forefront here so that we can return back the jump rope with our best technique next.
On the bar muscle-ups, focus on our push, rather than our pull. Using our lats, we are looking to drive the bar down the ground, versus pulling ourselves towards it. At this point in the workout, this is important given the amount of repetitions we have already moved through. Secondly, we want to bring our toes higher on this movement during the kip swing. Maintaining the long body beneath the bar (just like the rings), as we come through, bringing the toes up to chest level will further our kip. The standard is that the heels cannot rise above the pull-up bar (which is labeled an “uprise”), but we can harness the power of that kip within the standards. Video demonstration (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Eblaee0D3E&width=640&height=480).
Takeaway points:
1) Efficiency and management of the DU’s is key.
2) Expect adversity, and expect to overcome it. Having a game plan for the rope is good, but let feel dictate our breaks over holding firm to numbers.
3) Spend as much time as needed opening the shoulders for the gymnastic movements and the weighted overhead movements. Proper positions here is incredibly important to finding our best score, as the more efficient we move, the farther we’ll get (and the better we’ll perform when fatigued).

Warm-up


PRIMER
2:00 Very light Row or Bike
2 Sets:
4 Spiderman and Reach each leg (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_OrggvuVU-M&width=640&height=480)
8 Wall Squats (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pktIjwNiuYE&width=640&height=480)
:20s of Single-Unders

2:00 Light Row or Bike
2 Sets:
3 Inchworms (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gDweumAbvfQ&width=640&height=480)
6 Single Arm Dumbbell Deadlifts, each side
:20s of Double-Unders
1-2 Complexes:
3 Scap Retractions (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pktIjwNiuYE&width=640&height=480)
1-3 Strict Pull-Ups
3 Kip Swings
Steadily warm both the ring and bar muscle-ups, followed by rehearsal rounds:
1 Round at walk through pace:
15 Double-Unders, 5 Empty Bar Overhead Squats
15 Double-Unders, 1-2 Ring Muscle-Ups
15 Double-Unders, 3 Dumbbell Snatches each side (light)
15 Double-Unders, 1-2 Bar Muscle-Ups
Build to working overhead squat and dumbbell snatch load, followed by…
1 Round:
15 Double-Unders, 5 Overhead Squats
15 Double-Unders, 1-2 Ring Muscle-Ups
15 Double-Unders, 3 Dumbbell Snatches each side
15 Double-Unders, 1-2 Bar Muscle-Ups
Efficiency is highly important here on the jump rope. If we do not feel there just yet, without spending excessive amounts of repetitions on the rope before the workout, spend time dialing in our technique.
– Relax at the shoulders. Remind ourselves that it is our wrists that do the work.
– Visualize doing your double-unders in a narrow hallway. Hands close to the sides is ideal.
– Get long with the lower body in the air. It is common to see the pike (feet forward), or the donkey kick (heels rise back) during the double-under. If we can focus on getting long as we jump, as if we are bouncing on a pogo stick, we’ll find more efficient reps.

CrossFit Games Open workout

Crossfit Games Open 18.3 (Ages 16-54) (Time)


2 rounds for time of:

100 double-unders
20 overhead squats 115/80 lb
100 double-unders
12 ring muscle-ups
100 double-unders
20 dumbbell snatches 50/35 lb
100 double-unders
12 bar muscle-ups

Time cap: 14 minutes

Crossfit Games Open 18.3 Masters (55+) (Time)


2 rounds for time of:

100 double-unders
20 overhead squats 75/55 lb
100 double-unders
12 chest-to-bar pull-ups
100 double-unders
20 dumbbell snatches 35/20 lb
100 double-unders
12 chest-to-bar pull-ups

Time cap: 14 minutes

Crossfit Games Open 18.3 Scaled (Ages 16-54) (Time)


2 rounds for time of:

100 single-unders
20 overhead squats 45/35 lb
100 single-unders
12 chin-over-bar pull-ups
100 single-unders
20 dumbbell snatches 35/20 lb
100 single-unders
12 chin-over-bar pull-ups

Time cap: 14 minutes

Crossfit Games Open 18.3 Scaled Masters (55+) (Time)


2 rounds for time of:

100 single-unders
20 overhead squats 45/35 lb
100 single-unders
12 jumping chest-to-bar pull-ups
100 single-unders
20 dumbbell snatches 20/10 lb
100 single-unders
12 jumping chest-to-bar pull-ups

Time cap: 14 minutes

Bryant Johnson

Bryant Johnson

Owner/Coach

CrossFit Level 1, CF-L2, CrossFit Kids, CrossFit Football, Retired 9 yr NFL Wide Receiver

Michael Jenkins

Michael Jenkins

Owner/Coach

Dan Moore

Dan Moore

Coach

CrossFit Level 1, CF-L2

Josh Diehl

Josh Diehl

Coach

CF-L1

Jeff Dercola

Jeff Dercola

Coach

CF-L1

Michelle Casto

Michelle Casto

Coach

CF-L2, CrossFit Mobility

Sawyer Green

Sawyer Green

Coach

CrossFit Level 1